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How Much Does It Cost to Own a Dog?

So, you have decided you would like to add a dog to your family. Wonderful! Dogs are great for getting you out of the house for some exercise, they are therapeutic and lots of fun. But how much does it cost to own a dog? 

Puppy in lap

Should you purchase a dog or adopt one? Weigh the cost.

Before adding a dog or any pet to your household it is important to determine how much your dog is going to cost you on a yearly basis. Not just how much it will cost to purchase or adopt your new pal, but how much it will cost for food, training, veterinary bills and more.

Let’s look at some of the costs you will incur.

Purchase or adoption

If you are set on a pure breed puppy your purchase price could be as much as $5,000 if you get your puppy from a reputable breeder. Shelters and rescue organizations also have purebred dogs up for adoption, but you may not get that cute 8-week old puppy (see our blog on the pros and cons of getting a puppy). If you have your heart set on a particular breed there is a rescue group for every breed out there. Shelter adoption fees can range from $35-$75, and usually include vaccinations and spay/neuter and microchip. If you decide to adopt from a rescue organization, adoption fees can be anywhere from $200-$700 depending on the breed and the rescue’s expenses. These dogs too are vaccinated, spayed/neutered and microchipped.  

You can save quite a lot of money if you are willing to adopt a puppy and even more money if you adopt an adult dog.

Veterinary Care

Just ordinary annual vet care is going to cost somewhere between $100 to $400. This does not include possible emergencies which can run into the thousands of dollars. While pet insurance can help with some emergency expenses, most companies do not cover annual vaccinations. If you insure your pet, which we think is a great idea, you will usually have to put out the initial expense of emergency or extraordinary veterinary care. You then get reimbursed for a portion of that care. In the long run, pet insurance can save you a considerable amount of money.

You will save a good amount of money if you adopt from your local shelter or rescue as these dogs are already spayed/neutered, which is a big expense. Rescue dogs are also vaccinated, so you could have as much as an entire year before your new dog needs to be vaccinated again.

Heartworm, Flea and Tick Control

Heartworm can cost as much as $300 per year depending on the size of your dog. Flea and tick control will run anywhere from $50-$250 per year.

Dog balancing cookie on nose

The cost of food will depend on the quality.

Food and Treats

If you want to feed your dog nothing but the best, it can cost you as much as $600 per year depending on the size of your dog. If you are not picky about what your dog eats you can most budget for about $150 per year, but you may spend more on vet bills.

Bowls, Beds, Toys, Leashes, and Collars

This is an area where your personal style and tastes can affect your monetary output. If you are looking for designer items, you will usually spend more than if you are shopping at your local dollar store.

You might be able to find some great items at your local garage sales or local buy, sell trade groups.

Training

Yes, your new dog is going to need training. Group classes usually start at around $125 for a six-week class, but if your new buddy needs more personalized private training you could spend anywhere from $60-$100 per hour depending on where you live and the experience of your trainer.

Grooming

Dog grooming can be very expensive depending on your dog’s breed and coat length. You also must take into consideration how often you want your dog bathed and how much effort you are willing to put into the process. Are you comfortable trimming your dog’s nails and expressing their anal glands? If this gives you pause, then your grooming bill will be more. In other words, your short-haired Labrador that you are willing to bathe, and trim nails is going to cost considerably less than your Goldendoodle that needs monthly professional grooming. So, if you are willing to get a little wet and have the patience to trim your dog’s nails and such you could be looking at grooming costs as low as $30 per year, but if you have a higher maintenance dog and/or if you are using a mobile groomer, your grooming bills could run as much as $1,500 a year or more.

Dog getting a bath

The cost of grooming will depend on how much effort you are willing to put in.

Other Considerations

If you live in a house will you need a fence to keep your new companion contained? What about taking your dog out for a car ride? You will then need a crate or other restraint. And what about if you want to or need to go out of town? You will then need someone to care for your dog.

Having a dog is a lifelong commitment and being aware of the possible costs of dog ownership can give you a good idea if you are ready to make that commitment. We hope the answer is a resounding yes! Dogs are a wonderful family addition.

Would you like to learn more about caring for your new dog? Contact us.

Easy Peanut Butter and Pumpkin Dog Treats

I love baking for my dogs and giving them homemade dog treats is the best! This recipe is one of their favorites. It is such a quick and easy dog treat recipe that will leave your dog wanting more and I hope you will have fun making them.

Heart-shaped cookie cutter

Cut your treats with a heart-shaped cookie cutter to celebrate Valentine’s Day with your dog.

This is a cookie cutter recipe and I found some really cute dog bone and dog paw shaped cookie cutters online, but you can use whatever cookie cutter shape you like. Hearts might be fun for Valentine’s Day.   

This recipe usually takes me about 50 minutes to an hour to complete from start to finish.

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cups of canned pumpkin
  • ¼ cup unsalted peanut butter
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 cups whole wheat flour (much healthier than white flour)

I like to use organic ingredients when available although this recipe will work with the ingredients you have available.

Directions:

  • Preheat your oven to 350°
  • Beat the canned pumpkin, unsalted peanut butter, and eggs together in a large mixing bowl using an electric beater on medium-high. You want to make sure these ingredients are mixed together very well.
  • Slowly mix in the flour one cup at a time until the mixture is not sticky.  You may want to add the last cup 1/4 cup at a time.
  • Place mixture on a flat, floured surface.
  • You will need to knead the mixture a few times.
  • Roll out to a thickness of ¼”.
  • Using your cookie cutters cut your treats into your desired shapes and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet or silicone baking mat.
  • Bake 20-25 minutes. The longer you cook the treats the crunchier they will be.
  • Make sure the treats are completely cooled before feeding them to your dog. 
Dog taking treat from hand

Your dog will love these easy to make treats.

Please let us know if you made these for your dogs and how they liked them in the comments below.