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What is Ehrlichiosis and How Can It Affect My Dog?

Here in South Florida, we enjoy warm weather year-round. We have the luxury taking our dogs out with us to enjoy the Florida sunshine throughout the year.

Ticks love warm weather too. The tick-borne disease, Ehrlichiosis, is found in dogs more frequently than you might think. In fact, there are some veterinarians who think their canine patients should be checked yearly for the disease just like they are checked for heartworm.

What is Ehrlichiosis in Dogs?

Lone star tick in finger

The lone star tick is one of the most common ticks to spread Ehrlichiosis

Ehrlichiosis is a bacterial infection that is caused by a tick bite. The rickettsial organism is responsible for this tick-borne disease. There are two types of Ehrlichiosis in dogs: Canine Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis and Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis.

How Can My Dog Get Ehrlichiosis?

Ehrlichiosis is transmitted when a dog is bitten by an infected tick. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the lone star tick is the most common tick to carry Canine Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis. The brown dog tick is the most common transmitter of Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis. As the name implies, the brown dog tick feeds mainly off dogs and is, therefore, most commonly found in areas where dogs frequent, such as dog parks.

What Are the Symptoms of Ehrlichiosis In Dogs?

Dogs infected with Ehrlichiosis may show symptoms such as swollen lymph nodes, fever, weight loss, lethargy, lack of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, lameness, chronic eye inflammation, fever, respiratory distress and bleeding conditions, depending on the type. Occasionally there are signs of neurological disorders. When dogs are exhibiting these symptoms, they are at the chronic stage, having had the infection for some time. 

Dog being examined by veterinarian

There are several symptoms your dog may exhibit if infected with Ehrlichiosis.

Dogs in the early stages of the disease do not normally show any signs. One of the ways the disease may be diagnosed early is if blood is taken and shows a low platelet count. Some dogs that are exposed never show any signs of the disease.

How Can I Prevent Ehrlichiosis In My Dog?

There is no vaccine for the prevention of Ehrlichiosis, so the best way to prevent the disease is to protect your dog from tick bites. Talk to your veterinarian about the best tick prevention for your dog.

What Happens If My Dog Is Diagnosed with Ehrlichiosis?

The most common treatment is the antibiotic doxycycline.

If your dog is experiencing a bleeding disorder, a blood transfusion may be necessary.

Once your dog receives treatment the prognosis for a complete recovery is good and you should see improvements within the first day or two.

Can I Get Ehrlichiosis?

Yes, but only from a tick bite. You cannot get it from your dog as the disease is only transmitted through tick bites.

Ehrlichiosis is a very serious disease and it is wise to check your dog regularly for ticks. Please make sure you know the correct method for removing ticks as doing this incorrectly can cause the tick head to break off and cause infection or cause the tick to excrete more saliva increasing your dog’s chances of becoming ill.

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How to Train Your Dog to Sit

English bulldog sitting next to a person looking up at them.

Sit can be the basis of other behaviors you can train your dog to do.

Whether it is your new puppy or older dog, teaching them the sit command is an important lesson for them to learn. It is also, usually, one of the easiest commands to teach. Here is an easy way to train your dog to sit.

Having your dog sit when asked can come in handy in a variety of situations from sitting before going out of a doorway, sitting at the veterinarian’s office, sitting for a nail trim, to sitting beside you at an outdoor café. The sit command is a versatile command and will serve you and your dog well throughout your years together.

What is the Best Training Method?

Here at Dances with Dogs, we only use positive reinforcement training. What does that mean? We only use treats, toys, and praise. We ignore bad behavior and reward good behavior. Wouldn’t you work harder if you knew that every time you got it right something great was going to happen? How hard would you work if you knew that if every time you got it wrong something bad was going to happen?

Why Should You Train Your Dog to Sit?

Having your dog learn the sit command is essential, so this is one of the first commands they should learn. It is also the base for other behaviors they should learn, so learning the sit command is the start of great learning experiences for your dog and great training experiences for you.

How Long Will It Take?

Each dog learns at a different pace just like people, so be patient. Learning sit is a fairly easy command for dogs to learn, so it shouldn’t take too long. It also depends on how much time you invest in the process. You want training to be fun, so it is important to keep your training sessions to about 10 minutes in length. If you try to train your dog for longer periods of time you run the risk of him/her getting frustrated, distracted, bored or just tired.

How to Train Your Dog to Sit 

Before you get started, you need lots of yummy treats. These treats should be small (pea sized) and something your dog finds incredibly delicious. Some things that work well are small pieces of cheese, cooked chicken, dried liver, a dog food roll cut into small pieces, cut up hot dogs, etc. You want something that really keeps their attention and doesn’t take too long for them to eat. If your dog is not motivated by food try using their favorite toy or praise. 

Step 1 

Hold a small piece of treat in your hand, so that your dog can smell it and then slowly raise your hand up and back over their head so that they have to look up. This should cause them to have to sit down. If your dog tries to jump up to get the treat your hand may be too high above their head. Lower your hand a bit and try again. 

Black and tan puppy lifting his head up and beginning to it.

When starting to train your dog to sit hold the treat just above his head so that he must lift his head. This should cause him to sit.

Step 2

Just as your dog sits say “yes!” or “good” or whatever word works best for you and pop the treat in their mouth.

Step 3

Once your dog is consistently sitting 5 times in a row during your practice sessions you can then put a command word to it. So, say “sit” as you raise your hand above their head and as soon as their rear end hits the ground reward and praise.

Step 4

Once your dog has the behavior down, you can phase out your treats by only giving them occasionally. Mix it up. Sometimes give your dog a treat every three sits, then every 5 sits, then every two sits. Keep them guessing, that is part of the fun.

Step 5

Always have fun and end on a high note. Always try to end your training sessions when your dog has done the behavior correctly. Even if your dog is having a great training session don’t be tempted to push it. You want every session to be fun.

Things You Should Never Do

Never push on your dog’s back end to get them to sit. You could do physical harm to your dog and it does not help your dog to learn to sit.

Never repeat your command. In other words, ask your dog to “sit”, but never say “sit, sit, sit,” if your dog doesn’t sit after the first request.

Never yell or shout at your dog. If you are getting frustrated it is time to call it a day. Try to end your training session on a positive note even if that means asking your dog to do something they already know like fetch a ball or give kisses. But, if you are finding yourself raising your voice it is time to take a break.

Papillon surrounded by dog toys

When you train your dog to sit you may find that toys motivate your dog more than food does.

Troubleshooting

If your dog just won’t sit there could be several reasons. Make sure it is not medical. Does your dog sit on her/his own when not being asked? If not, a trip to the vet may be in order. Are your treats yummy enough? Make sure you are using very high-value treats when teaching a new behavior. If your dog still isn’t interested in treat maybe food isn’t his/her thing. Try using a ball, toy or praise as a reward instead. Are there too many distractions? If there is a lot going on when you are trying to train it might be a good idea to move to a quieter area.

If You Would Like to Learn More About How to Train Your Dog, Please Contact Us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kids and Dogs: Preventing a Dog Bite

Young smiling boy holding a puppy

Teach kids to respect dogs to prevent a dog bite.

 

Kids and dogs just seem to go together. There is nothing better than growing up with your best pal by your side. I loved having a dog when I was growing up. But not all dogs are kid friendly, so it is extremely important for you and your children to be able to understand when a dog, including your own, is stressed. It is also very important to teach your children to treat the family dog with respect and treat, to prevent a dog bite.

For most parents, when the family dog bites, it seems like it came out of nowhere. But dogs give warning signals that they are uncomfortable. It is our job as parents and dog owners to make sure to not only protect our children but also protect our dogs. We need to keep our dogs out of stressful situations so that they do feel the need to protect themselves. Here are a few things you can teach your kids not to do to or around the family dog or any dog. 

The Don’t to Prevent a Dog Bite:

 

Teach kids to not hug the dog to prevent a dog bite.

Teach kids to not hug the dog to prevent a dog bite.

  • Never hug any dog. While we humans love hugs, dogs do not like to be hugged.
  • Do not step or stand on your dog. Just like we do not like to be stepped on, neither do our dogs.
  • Do not pull on any dog’ ears or tail or handle roughly. Nobody likes to be treated that way.
  • Do not disturb a sleeping dog.
  • Never run up to a strange dog.
  • Do not yell or scream at or near your dog. Loud noises can startle a dog.
  • Do not get in your dog’s face. Teach your kids that dogs need personal space just like people do.
  • Do not put your hands or face near the dog’s food bowl, especially while they are eating. How would you like it if someone stuck their hands in your food?
  • Do not take your dog’s toys away from them while they are chewing on them.

The Dos to Prevent a Dog Bite: 

Respecting dogs can prevent a dog bite.

Respecting dogs can prevent a dog bite.

  • Always ask permission from you and from the dog’s owners before petting a strange dog.
  • Play with your dog. Fetch is always a good choice.
  • Get involved with training your dog. I loved teaching my dog cool tricks. Well, I still do.

Teach your kids to be polite to the dog and teach your dog to be polite to the kids and everyone can have a safe and happy life together.

 

 

 

If you would like to learn more about keeping kids safe around dogs, please contact us about our Dog Bite Safety Education program.

Microchipping Pets: Costs and Benefits

Losing a pet is a pet owner’s worst nightmare.  Sometimes, pets are never recovered, but microchipping your pet increases the odds of being reunited with your lost pet. According to PetFinder.com “Only about 22 percent of lost dogs that entered the animal shelters were reunited with their families. However, the return-to-owner rate for microchipped dogs was over 52 percent (a 238 percent increase). Less than 2 percent of lost cats that entered the animal shelters were reunited with their families.” 

Little girl reunited with her dog

Microchipping your pet increases the chances you will be reunited if they are ever lost.

What is microchipping?

A microchip is about the size of a grain of rice. This electronic chip is enclosed in a glass cylinder and when a scanner passes over the chip, the chip is activated and transmits an identification number unique to your pet. It is inserted under your pet’s skin, usually between the shoulder blades, through a hypodermic needle. There is no surgery required and it should not be any more painful than a normal injection.

What Information Does the Microchip Contain?

Your pet’s microchip will contain an identification number and is registered with a microchip registry where your contact information is stored. If your pet should become lost a veterinarian, shelter or rescue group can scan your pet and contact the microchip registry to notify them that they have your pet. The microchip registry will then contact you. Your contact information is not shared with the rescuer.

Cat being scanned for microchip

If your lost pet is found a veterinarian or rescue will scan for a microchip.

Do Microchips Have GPS?

No, microchips are not the same as GPS and do not have the capability to track your pet.

Do I Still Need Identification Tags if My Pet is Microchipped?

Yes! Identification tags are the quickest way for you to be reunited with your pet. While a microchip is a permanent identification that cannot be tampered with, having an identification tag attached to your pet’s collar makes it easy for the person who finds your pet to contact you immediately. However, if your pet’s collar is removed or lost, a microchip may be the only way you will be reunited with your pet.

Are Only Dogs and Cats Microchipped?

No, all kinds of pets are microchipped including rabbits, horses, cows, ferrets, reptiles and many more.

At What Age Can my Pet Be Microchipped?

Most Shelters and veterinarians will microchip your dog or cat once they are 8 weeks old. It is actually the size of your pet that determines when they can be microchipped.

What Are the Risks of Microchipping?

Complications from microchipping your pet are very rare. There have been cases of a pet developing a cancerous tumor at the microchip site, but those cases are very rare. The benefits of getting your lost pet back far outweigh the risks. 

Veterinarian injecting microchip into a dog.

Microchipping can be done by your veterinarian or local shelter.

How Do I Get My Pet Microchipped?

Your veterinarian or local animal shelter can microchip your pet for you. If you adopt a pet from your shelter or local pet rescue it will most likely already be microchipped.

How Much Does Microchipping Cost?

The average cost is about $45 however, your local shelter or Humane Society will usually offer microchipping at a discounted price. The price is a one-time fee. If you are adopted your pet from a local shelter or rescue, it is likely that your pet is already microchipped.

Do I have to Register My Pet’s Microchip?

Yes. When your pet is microchipped the shelter or veterinarian will provide you with the information you need to have your pet’s microchip registered. If you move or change phone numbers, you will need to update your contact information.

May is National Chip Your Pet month. This is a great time to get your pet microchipped if you have not already done so. This is also a great time to have your pet’s microchip checked by taking them to your local veterinarian to have them scanned.

Is your pet microchipped? Tell us what type of pet you have and why or why not you have chosen to have your pet microchipped.

 

The Benefits of Hiring a Pet Sitter and Why You Should Use a Professional

 

Pet sitter with pets on sofa.

Your pets get to stay in the comfort of their own home with a professional pet sitter.

Why Choose a Professional Pet Sitter?

So you have decided to take that much-needed vacation. Or maybe you need to travel for business. What do you do with your beloved pets? You could impose on friends, family or neighbors. You could send your pets off to a strange boarding facility.  Or you could hire a professional pet sitter.  

A professional pet sitter is just that, a professional. They have the experience and training to make sure your pets get the best care possible and your pet never has to leave the comfort of their own home.

What are the benefits of hiring a pet sitter?

  • You may want to go on vacation, but your pets will usually be happier staying in their own environment.
  • Your pets get to stay on their normal diet and exercise routine. 

    Dog sleeping with teddy bear

    Your pets keep to their regular routine with a pet sitter.

  • You limit your pet’s exposure to illnesses.
  • Your mail, newspapers, and packages are taken in so that your house looks lived in and not like you are away.
  • You don’t have to impose on your friends, family or neighbors.

Why should you hire a professional pet sitter?

  • Caring for your pets is their first priority.
  • They have experience and training working with all types of pets.
  • They are experienced in dealing with all types of pet personalities and will be knowledgeable in helping your pet feel relaxed and happy in your absence.
  • They can tell if your pet needs veterinary care.
  • They have the training to administer medications to your pet if needed.
  • They are experienced in recognizing and avoiding situations that may be potentially dangerous for your pet.

What to look for when choosing your professional pet sitter:

The person you are considering hiring should have the following:

  • A business license for your county.
  • Bonding to protect against theft and liability insurance in case there is an accident.
  • Back up in case they have an emergency and cannot make it to your home.
  • A detailed contract which includes pricing and services.

Things to ask your pet sitter:

  • What kind of training have they completed, such as pet first aid/CPR courses? 

    Black cat eating from bowl

    Your pet will stay on their regular feeding schedule with a pet sitter.

  • Will they come to your house before your departure to meet you and your pets?
  • How will they communicate with you in your absence?
  • Are they a member of a professional association such as Pet Sitters International?
  • What other services do they offer, such as mail and package retrieval, light rotation and plant watering?

So, if you decide that hiring a pet sitter is right for you and your pets make sure you hire a professional pet sitter.

Even if you don’t have a trip planned for the near future start your search well in advance. You want to make sure you and your pet sitter are a good fit and that you feel comfortable leaving your pets in their care.

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it with a friend.

Thank you!

Here are a couple of ways to locate the perfect  professional pet sitter for you:

Pet Sitters International and Angie’s List.

Did you find this article helpful? If you would like to learn more about our pet sitting services please contact us.

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What is Separation Anxiety in Dogs? Does Your Dog Suffer From It?

What is separation anxiety in dogs? Does your dog suffer from it? Here is my experience of living with a dog with separation anxiety, the signs to look for and what you can do to help your dog if you suspect he or she is suffering from separation anxiety.

Dog looking out window

Dogs with separation anxiety may chew through walls to get out and find you.

Many years ago, I adopted a beautiful four-month-old puppy from a couple who kept him in a dark, hot garage 24 hours a day. They rarely let him out, even to relieve himself. It was four horrible months for this little guy, so when I brought him home he was immediately attached to me and panicked every time I had to leave him. The first two weeks weren’t too bad as I had taken vacation time to help him adjust to his new life with me, but I did notice that when I left the house, even for a brief time, he would panic.

I once ran up to the local store, leaving my puppy gated in the kitchen, only to receive a call from my alarm company stating my alarm had been triggered, again. This time the poor guy had pulled the microwave off the counter. One of the previous times he had knocked over the cabinet where I kept my china. He ate through the drywall by my front door and urinated and defecated all over my house, no matter how many times I took him out. All because I left him.

A well-meaning friend suggested I crate him. He turned that crate into a twisted mass of metal. It was incredible he didn’t physically hurt himself. I cannot imagine what torment that poor dog went through.

I hired a trainer to help me help him, but he needed more than a trainer. This was 30 years ago. Today, trainers, veterinarians, and behaviorists know so much more about how to help dogs with separation anxiety. This is not to say that there is an easy fix for separation anxiety, there isn’t. But you can help your dog if you are willing to put in the work.

What are the symptoms of separation anxiety?

  • Getting upset as you are getting ready to leave.
  • Overly excited when you return.
  • Urinating and defecating in the house while you are away even though they have had ample opportunities to relieve themselves before you left.

    Dog destroying item

    Dogs with separation anxiety may become destructive

  • Whining
  • Barking
  • Panting
  • Excessive salivation
  • Destructive behavior
  • Vomiting

What you can do to help:

  • First things first, see your veterinarian in order to make sure there isn’t some underlying issue that is mimicking separation anxiety.
  • Feed your dog just before leaving the house. This can help your dog associate something positive with your departure.
  • Keep your departures and arrivals low key.
  • Provide your dog with lots of interactive toys to keep them occupied.
  • Sometimes adding another dog to the family can help, but there is no guarantee.
  • There are medications that may help, but they are not long-term solutions.
  • Hire a dog walker or pet sitter to keep your dog company while you are away.

    Sad dog

    A dog with separation anxiety may be helped if you are willing to put in the work

One or more of the solutions above may help your dog cope with their separation anxiety. Be patient, it may take some time to figure out what works best for your dog.

Do you think your dog suffers from separation anxiety? Contact us to see how we can help.

How Much Does It Cost to Own a Dog?

So, you have decided you would like to add a dog to your family. Wonderful! Dogs are great for getting you out of the house for some exercise, they are therapeutic and lots of fun. But how much does it cost to own a dog? 

Puppy in lap

Should you purchase a dog or adopt one? Weigh the cost.

Before adding a dog or any pet to your household it is important to determine how much your dog is going to cost you on a yearly basis. Not just how much it will cost to purchase or adopt your new pal, but how much it will cost for food, training, veterinary bills and more.

Let’s look at some of the costs you will incur.

Purchase or adoption

If you are set on a pure breed puppy your purchase price could be as much as $5,000 if you get your puppy from a reputable breeder. Shelters and rescue organizations also have purebred dogs up for adoption, but you may not get that cute 8-week old puppy (see our blog on the pros and cons of getting a puppy). If you have your heart set on a particular breed there is a rescue group for every breed out there. Shelter adoption fees can range from $35-$75, and usually include vaccinations and spay/neuter and microchip. If you decide to adopt from a rescue organization, adoption fees can be anywhere from $200-$700 depending on the breed and the rescue’s expenses. These dogs too are vaccinated, spayed/neutered and microchipped.  

You can save quite a lot of money if you are willing to adopt a puppy and even more money if you adopt an adult dog.

Veterinary Care

Just ordinary annual vet care is going to cost somewhere between $100 to $400. This does not include possible emergencies which can run into the thousands of dollars. While pet insurance can help with some emergency expenses, most companies do not cover annual vaccinations. If you insure your pet, which we think is a great idea, you will usually have to put out the initial expense of emergency or extraordinary veterinary care. You then get reimbursed for a portion of that care. In the long run, pet insurance can save you a considerable amount of money.

You will save a good amount of money if you adopt from your local shelter or rescue as these dogs are already spayed/neutered, which is a big expense. Rescue dogs are also vaccinated, so you could have as much as an entire year before your new dog needs to be vaccinated again.

Heartworm, Flea and Tick Control

Heartworm can cost as much as $300 per year depending on the size of your dog. Flea and tick control will run anywhere from $50-$250 per year.

Dog balancing cookie on nose

The cost of food will depend on the quality.

Food and Treats

If you want to feed your dog nothing but the best, it can cost you as much as $600 per year depending on the size of your dog. If you are not picky about what your dog eats you can most budget for about $150 per year, but you may spend more on vet bills.

Bowls, Beds, Toys, Leashes, and Collars

This is an area where your personal style and tastes can affect your monetary output. If you are looking for designer items, you will usually spend more than if you are shopping at your local dollar store.

You might be able to find some great items at your local garage sales or local buy, sell trade groups.

Training

Yes, your new dog is going to need training. Group classes usually start at around $125 for a six-week class, but if your new buddy needs more personalized private training you could spend anywhere from $60-$100 per hour depending on where you live and the experience of your trainer.

Grooming

Dog grooming can be very expensive depending on your dog’s breed and coat length. You also must take into consideration how often you want your dog bathed and how much effort you are willing to put into the process. Are you comfortable trimming your dog’s nails and expressing their anal glands? If this gives you pause, then your grooming bill will be more. In other words, your short-haired Labrador that you are willing to bathe, and trim nails is going to cost considerably less than your Goldendoodle that needs monthly professional grooming. So, if you are willing to get a little wet and have the patience to trim your dog’s nails and such you could be looking at grooming costs as low as $30 per year, but if you have a higher maintenance dog and/or if you are using a mobile groomer, your grooming bills could run as much as $1,500 a year or more.

Dog getting a bath

The cost of grooming will depend on how much effort you are willing to put in.

Other Considerations

If you live in a house will you need a fence to keep your new companion contained? What about taking your dog out for a car ride? You will then need a crate or other restraint. And what about if you want to or need to go out of town? You will then need someone to care for your dog.

Having a dog is a lifelong commitment and being aware of the possible costs of dog ownership can give you a good idea if you are ready to make that commitment. We hope the answer is a resounding yes! Dogs are a wonderful family addition.

Would you like to learn more about caring for your new dog? Contact us.

Thinking of Getting a Puppy? What are the Pros and Cons?

Getting a puppy is a big commitment. If your family is considering bringing a new pup into your home you first need to make sure this is the right decision for your family’s lifestyle. A new pooch can be a wonderful addition to a family, here are some puppy pros and cons. 

Puppy

A puppy can be a great addition to your family

The Pros of Getting a Puppy:

Cuteness Overload!

Puppies are very cute, but remember that cute little ball of fur is going to grow into an adult dog. Don’t bring a puppy into your life just because it is adorable.

Puppy with ball

Your puppy will love to play.

Fun!

Watching a young pup play and romp is so much fun. Watching them tumble and roll with their favorite toy will give you your daily dose of laughter.

Health Benefits for You

You will get a lot of exercise chasing after and playing with your new addition. As your puppy matures into an adult dog you will both enjoy getting exercise on your daily walks. Studies show that people who have a dog at home have fewer heart attacks and if they do have a heart attack they have a better survival and recovery rate.

Less Stress

Petting a dog has been shown to reduce stress and lower blood pressure. It also increases dopamine and serotonin levels.

The Cons of Getting a Puppy:

Constant Supervision

Puppies can get into trouble quickly. Puppies must be supervised at all times. When you can’t be there to supervise, crate training your new family member will help keep him or her out of trouble.

Chewing 

Puppy chewing on a person's hand

Puppy teeth can hurt.

It is natural for puppies to want to chew. They will chew your shoes, your furniture, electrical cords and even you.

They Need to Relieve Themselves Often

As a rule of thumb, a young dog can only hold it for as many hours as his or her age is in months. So, if you have a 2-month-old dog he or she will need to go out every two hours. This is where a professional dog walker can really help you while you are at work.

Puppy on leash

Your puppy will need to go out often.

Lots of Cleaning up

While you will try to be diligent about taking your puppy outside, accidents do happen. There is also the potential mess if your puppy chews something up, such as paper or a pillow.

Having a puppy in the house can be fun and entertaining, but they are also a lot of hard work. Make sure all family members are ready for such a big responsibility. If you decide that a puppy is right for you, have fun and enjoy!

If you would like more information on our puppy visits for your long work days, please contact us.

Five Plants that are Toxic to Your Pets

While we love having plants in our homes and yards we need to be aware that some of those plants are toxic to our pets. Our pets are not aware of the dangers and may chew on the leaves or flowers of these common plants.

Aloe

We have all seen the articles about having aloe plants in our home to clean the air, but aloe can be very toxic to our dogs and cats. If you suspect your pet has ingested aloe here are some of the symptoms to look for: diarrhea, vomiting, depression and occasionally tremors. Get your pet to the veterinarian immediately. 

Aloe is Toxic to Both Dogs and Cats.

Bird of Paradise

This plant is all over South Florida and it can be mildly toxic to your dogs and cats. If you suspect your pet has ingested Bird of Paradise some of the symptoms will include lethargy, vomiting and nausea. Get your pet to the veterinarian as soon as possible. 

Bird of Paradise can cause lethargy and more when ingested.

Calla Lily

This is a very common house plant and it can be very toxic to your dogs and cats.  If you suspect your pet your pet has ingested any part of a calla lily plant you need to seek immediate veterinary attention for them. Some of the symptoms are excessive drooling, vomiting and irritation of the mouth. 

Calla Lily can burn and irritate your pet’s mouth.

Rubber Plant

While this plant is not as toxic as some of the others, it is a common house plant and caution needs to be used. The rubber plant is toxic to both dogs and cats and will cause diarrhea and vomiting. Contact your veterinarian to see what your course of action should be if your pet ingests any part of this plant.

This common house plant can cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Sago Palm

This plant is very common in South Florida and is extremely toxic to your dogs and cats. If your pet ingests any part of the sago palm in can cause death. You must get your pet to a veterinarian without delay. Some of the symptoms are increased thirst, bruising and vomiting. Ingestion of the sago palm can cause severe internal bleeding, liver damage and even liver failure. 

The sago palm can be deadly to your pets.

How Your Pet Sitter Keeps Your Home Safe: Keys, Alarm Codes and More

 

Chocolate lab getting a chin scratch

Pet sitters help keep your pets and home safe

When I first started Dances with Dogs 16 years ago my husband looked at me and said, “no one is ever going to give you the keys to their home.” Thankfully he was wrong, but I took his words seriously and have made our clients’ home security a top priority. We strive to keep your home safe, along with your pets, when entrusted to our care.

So, what do Dances with Dogs do to help keep your home safe?

Advertising

We never advertise our pet sitting or dog walking services on our vehicles or clothing while at your home. Why do we do this? Because we feel that this type of advertising attracts unwanted attention to your home, announcing that you are away.

Keys

We take having the keys to your home very seriously. Keys are never tagged with your name or address. Keys are locked securely away when not in use. There is always a backup key locked up in our office in case of an emergency. Keys are never returned by leaving them under doormats or planters, they are only returned in person. We will not leave your keys in your home on the last visit and lock the door when we leave. What happens if you are delayed and we need to make an additional visit?

Alarm Codes

Alarm codes are stored on our secure online scheduling system. We ask that you now write them down and leave them in your home.

Home and Pet Information

All information you provide to us about your home and pets is also stored on our secure online scheduling system.

So next time you travel you can be assured that Dances with Dogs takes your home security seriously and know that your home and keys are well taken care of as well as your pets of course.

If you have questions and would like more information give us a call at 786-299-1552